THE Premier Low-Carb store .. .. AND Meeting Place

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

*SINGLE PIE CRUST*

A reader of my blog requested this recipe which is part of the Glazed Strawberry Cheese pie recipe below. Sometimes I produce "teasers" and don't give all the details, in the hope that I'll interest people in my books from time to time. Thing is if I give away everything, why does anyone need them?

SINGLE PIECRUST
This is a lower carb and more substantial crust that tastes great. Recipe from Splendid Low-Carb Desserts.

1 1/8 cups Low-Carb Bake Mix, (275 mL)
page 22
3 oz cream cheese, softened (90 g)
1 tbsp SPLENDA® Granular (15 mL)
1 tbsp butter, softened (15 mL)
1/4 tsp baking soda (1 mL)
1/8 tsp salt (0.5 mL)

In food processor or in bowl with electric mixer, process Low-Carb Bake Mix, page 22, cream cheese, SPLENDA® Granular, butter, baking soda and salt until mixed. Form a ball with dough using your hands. Chill dough about 1 hour.

Roll dough out between two sheets of wax paper to fit shallow 9-inch (23 cm) glass pie dish with a flat border (do not roll out too thin). Remove top sheet of wax paper. Pick up sheet with dough and invert over pie dish. Use flat dinner knife to carefully ease dough off wax paper. Use small rolling pin or small cylindrical object in pie dish, if necessary, to further roll dough. Patch dough where required.

Press dough onto pie dish border, cut to size and patch where necessary. Make an attractive edging by pressing dough with tines of fork and leaving spaces in between. Bake in 350°F (180°C) oven 10 minutes, or until golden brown. This crust browns extremely quickly; therefore, if baking again with filling, it’s best to bake only 5 minutes before adding filling and baking. Cover pie lightly with foil tent (See Helpful Hints, #10, page 5) from beginning of baking to end, otherwise crust becomes too dark. It will still be edible, but it’s best to aim for a golden brown color.

Helpful Hints: If using a deep 9-inch (23 cm) pie dish for more substantial fillings, press dough up sides only (straight edge). Push down slightly from edge onto dough with thumbs and this will make a slightly thicker border for the crust. It is possible to skip chilling the dough, however, it is easier to handle when chilled.

Nutritional Analysis: 10 servings: 1 serving: 1.6 g carbs

Chronic Inflammation Makes One Fat by Blocking Insulin Receptors

I had to mention this when I read it. I was in a bit of shock at this revelation! I guess it makes sense: Jonny Bowden's article.

Roger Deutsch, co-author of the excellent book, "Your Hidden Food Allergies Are Making You Fat" had this to say: "Now we know that chronic inflammation, caused primarily by exposure to incompatible foods, is at the root of metabolic problems like diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity. The immune system chemicals block insulin receptors; so, guess what happens to the sugars we eat? - they get stored as fat. Cut the inflammation, cut the fat storage."

Sunday, April 26, 2009

MILK CHOCOLATE (GF)


All I did was add an extra square of baking chocolate. Easy! If making chocolate frosting use only 1 square of chocolate. If making the milk chocolate use 2 squares of chocolate. It makes for a more substantial chocolate confection.

Milk Chocolate:
3/4 cup Splenda Granular (use your own preferred sweetener)
1/4 cup whole or skim milk powder (Hispanic section of Super Walmart or Publix)
3 tbsp whipping cream (or evaporated milk)
2 tbsp powdered erythritol
2 tbsp unsalted butter, melted
1 tbsp water
1 tsp olive oil
½ tsp vanilla extract
2 oz (2 squares) unsweetened baking chocolate

In blender, combine Splenda Granular, milk powder, whipping cream, erythritol, butter, water, olive oil and vanilla extract; blend. In cereal bowl, place 2 squares baking chocolate. Pour boiling water over chocolate and pour off when molten (test with a sharp, pointy knife). Add to blender; blend until combined. Spread in two mini loaf pans, or whatever metal or glass pan you have on hand and freeze. Cuts easily right out of the freezer with a blunt knife into pieces for a nice chocolate fix and pick-me-upper.

If you like, add almonds or hazelnuts to the molten chocolate, before freezing.

Saturday, April 25, 2009

Low-carbing on a Budget


These days low-carbing is an expensive proposition for folks, unless one has some practical workarounds. Being lazy and a bit clueless myself, I went to lowcarbfriends' forum and searched for some threads on the topic of low-carbing on a budget. It's amazing the ideas one can get from these clever people! If you're interested, perhaps read through the threads and jot down in a note book the ideas that make sense to you personally, and then try implementing them. Hopefully, your food budget will decrease and low-carbing will still be an option. When times are bad, people often resort to buying carbs, because they are cheap; long, white French loaves, rice, pasta, potatoes (oh, not this one so much lately. Anyone noticed potatoes going up in price? They sure have over here.), etc.

Here is one from lowcarbfriends and another thread and $20 a week food budget and here is the biggest thread ever!

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Another Reason to Eschew the Common Potato?


Health problems with the Potato? Although, I'm unlikely to skip eating potatoes forever and a day, this is good reason to limit eating those baked potatoes and potato fries.

Cooking is Chemistry in Action

Are you a food chemist? If you're the cook in the household, then chances are you have done a fair number of cooking chemistry experiments.

Check out this interesting article and video on Science Daily. :-)

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

*GLAZED FRUIT CHEESE PIES*


Photographed is the Glazed Strawberry Cheese Pie

GLAZED BLUEBERRY CHEESE PIE
A slice of this pie looks beautiful on a plate and tastes exquisite.

Single Pie Crust
Filling:
1 cup ricotta cheese (250 mL)
5 oz regular cream cheese (150 g)
1/2 cup SPLENDA® Granular (125 mL)
2 tsp lemon juice (10 mL)
Blueberry Topping:
13/4 cups frozen blueberries, (425 mL)
(unsweetened)
1/2 cup water (125 mL)
1/4 cup SPLENDA® Granular (50 mL)
3/4 tsp Thickening Agent, page 66 (3 mL)

Single Pie Crust

Filling: In food processor with sharp blade, blender or in bowl with electric mixer, process ricotta cheese until smooth. Add cream cheese, SPLENDA® Granular and lemon juice; process until smooth. Spread evenly over baked crust.
Chill until firm.

Blueberry Topping: In saucepan, combine blueberries, water, SPLENDA® Granular and Thickening Agent, page 66. Bring to boil and cook until blueberry sauce thickens. Allow to cool slightly. Pour topping over chilled cheese layer, leaving outer edge bare. Refrigerate pie. Later garnish with Crème Fraiche, page 67 around outer edge of pie, if desired.

Nutritional Analysis: 10 servings, 1 serving:
195.5 calories; 9.3 g protein; 14.3 g fat; 7.3 g carbs

Variations: Glazed Raspberry Cheese Pie: Substitute frozen unsweetened raspberries. (6.6 g Carbs)

Glazed Strawberry Cheese Pie: Substitute frozen unsweetened strawberries. (6.7 g Carbs).

Friday, April 17, 2009

*BETTER LOW-CARB BROWNIE*


FUDGEY BROWNIES
These are not like high carb brownies, some of which remind one of enjoying a chocolate-flavored sugar cube – seriously! Despite that high carb brownies are often delicious and very addictive. It is difficult to duplicate high carb brownies with low-carb ingredients. These are yummy low-carb brownies according to my DH and son (older DS does not like chocolate and would not even try one! I really don’t understand that dislike of chocolate. Surely, that is not normal?!). These brownies will seem a little cakey when warm, but they get fudgey and more solid quite quickly. They can be served chilled or at room temperature, depending on preference. Please don’t be tempted to skip the frosting – it is still the best part!

5 eggs
1 cup butter, melted
1 3/4 cups Carbalose Bake Mix, OR
Splendid Low-Carb Bake (see recipes below)
1/3 cup Dutch cocoa, OR other rich cocoa
1/2 cup powdered erythritol
16 SPLENDA® packets
2 tbsp granulated Xylitol (optional)
1 tsp baking powder
Rich Chocolate Frosting
1 1/2 cups SPLENDA® Granular
1/2 cup whole or skim milk powder (Hispanic section of Super Wal Mart or Publix)
6 tbsp whipping cream, OR evaporated milk
1/4 cup powdered erythritol
2 tbsp unsalted butter, melted
2 tbsp water
2 tsp mild-tasting olive oil
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 oz (2 squares) unsweetened baker’s chocolate, melted

In food processor or in bowl with electric mixer, process eggs. Add butter; process. Add Carbalose Bake Mix or Splendid Low-Carb Bake Mix, cocoa, powdered erythritol, Splenda, Xylitol (if using) and baking powder. Process until well combined. Spread brownie batter in greased 9 x 13-inch baking dish. Bake in 350°F oven 15 to 20 minutes, or until the batter is set all over. Do check after 15 minutes, as overbaked brownies are not very good. Spread chocolate frosting over warm brownies. Refrigerate when baking dish is cool enough or serve at room temperature.

Rich Chocolate Frosting: In blender, combine Splenda Granular, milk powder, whipping cream, erythritol, butter, water, olive oil and vanilla extract; blend well. In cereal bowl, place baking chocolate. Pour boiling water over chocolate and pour off when molten (test with knife). Add to blender; blend until combined.

Nutritional Analyses: 40 servings (8 x 5), 1 brownie
104.2 calories; 3.3 g protein; 8.7 g fat; 3.4 g carbs

32 servings (8 x 4), 1 brownie
130.2 calories; 4.1 g protein; 10.9 g fat; 4.3 g carbs

Carbalose Bake Mix:
1 2/3 cups almond or hazelnut flour (Netrition)
2/3 cup Carbalose flour (Netrition)
2/3 cup vital wheat gluten

Nutritional analysis: 1/4 cup = 3.4 g carbs

Splendid Low-Carb Bake Mix:
1 2/3 cups almond or hazelnut flour (Netrition)
2/3 cup whey protein powder (vanilla, chocolate or plain)
2/3 cup vital wheat gluten

Nutritional analysis: 1/4 cup = 2.8 g carbs

Helpful Hints: There is a choice of bake mixes to use. I rather liked the Carbalose Bake Mix version. After trying this with 1/3 cup cocoa, someone might want to experiment using ½ cup cocoa for a deeper chocolate flavor. Dutch cocoa already achieves that to some degree. I don’t think my waist line could stand any more brownie testing for now!! I still think the chocolate frosting is the best part, so don’t be tempted to skip it. I think hazelnut flour would be even better in the brownies than almond flour, because it has a milder flavor and does not cut the sweetness as much as almond flour tends to do. I used the Xylitol in these brownies but suspect they will be fine without, although a little less sweet. Remember Xylitol is poison for animals.

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Synergy of Low-Carb Sugar Free Sweeteners

I have used Splenda Granular for my family since forever - no, actually, going on almost 20 years now. In addition, I used the product to develop 7 cookbooks for people following special diets - namely, the traditional sugar free, low-fat diabetic diet and more recently and more prolifically the low-carb diet, which incidentally is better for someone with diabetes anyway.

Besides Splenda, there were not a whole lot of good choices for me those many years ago. We had Splenda in Canada (when I was living there) 10 years before the United States. As a result, that is partially, why I was the first in the world to write a cookbook for desserts using Splenda Granular. The other and more important reason I came to write my cookbooks is because, I believe, that was part of God's plan for my life for me to be productive in helping other people. My creative period coincided with a very difficult time in my life, when I was practically falling apart in some ways, due to my old family's utter rejection (disowned, abandoned, told to get lost by a third party actually) of me and my family (my darling husband and precious sons) - long, sad story. I have often wished things had been different (but then my life would not be what it is today - and, possibly, I would not even be a Christian), but one cannot control the choices, actions and decisions that others are responsible for in their own lives, and there are always repercussions - whether for good or for bad.)

The first cookbook became a runaway best seller in 6 short months and eventually the second book did become a best seller as well. I took a long time to write the second one. The Splenda company in Canada practically lost interest in it and in me and a lot of the funding due me went to another Canadian author with a diabetic-style menu cookbook, who had started using Splenda. What the Splenda folks did not realize is that I was suffering from depression due to the actions of my mother, as in the aforementioned story. The publishing company we chose for the 2nd cookbook, the biggest in Canada, hit financial difficulties and eventually that led to us buying our books back from them, as they were selling them for less than $1-00 each at one point. I was getting more pocket money from my husband than their meager royalties! Ironically, they wanted to sell them to us for about $7-00 each! We did get them for less than that though due to a violation on their part of our mutual contract. I did have another traditional diabetic cookbook after that almost ready for publishing, but switched to low-carbing and I subsequently lost interest in it - and, then, so did the Splenda Companies - both in Canada and the United States. The folks in America had made a short documentary video of me baking with Splenda in my kitchen and talking about the product for the launch of Splenda in America and there was an understanding that I would somehow feature - but all of that fell by the wayside. Another author (an American lady) was chosen. They no longer wanted to buy any more of my cookbooks and were certainly not interested one iota in any future low-carb cookbooks that I might have written. I think, personally, that it was so shortsighted of the Splenda companies (McNeil Consumer Products and Johnson and Johnson) not to recognize the low-carb community at all. And, fancy, combining Splenda and sugar in one bag and selling it for a premium! First of all, if I wanted to do that, I could do it in my own kitchen for less money spent, and second of all, if I'm using Splenda to avoid using sugar in the first place - why would I buy a combination product? Not only that, it totally negated their sales to the low-carb community, who don't want sugar at all. Their reluctance to provide liquid Splenda is another short-sighted decision. Then finally the Quick Packs arrived - yay! Now they are discontinuing them. Really, I don't blame the low-carb community for getting upset and switching to another product, when the opportunity avails. As it is, many have switched to sugar alcohols or Stevia or even honey and a Stevia combination - simply to avoid using Splenda. Now there are many questions arising over safety issues in any case. Still, I believe sugar would have been worse for my family than Splenda. Chances are none of you out there will ever consume in your lifetime as much as we have, so I'm still comfortable recommending it as an alternative to sugar in baking. It is inert and stable at high baking temperatures. It seems safe enough, but like with everything else we consume, there are some parts of the foods in our food chain that are not good for us. Meat has problems (hormones, grain fed, etc.), vegetables and fruits have problems (pesticides) and even our water supply is dubious at times - so we all do what we can, but, fact is, we're almost all of us consuming a little bit of something each day that is considered not good for our bodies.

Splendid Low-Carbing (the biggest book - written with enthusiasm, inspiration and sometimes tears) became a best seller and the 4 others have yet to reach that status, possibly because low-carbing fell out of favor soon after poor Dr. Atkins died.

I think if we had consumed that many desserts using white flour and white sugar, we'd probably be in worse shape than we are now. Our sons (22 and 25) have incredible physiques and, well, Ian and I are middle-aged and not too bad, considering prior to our Splenda switch we were sugar coke popaholics and loved sugary desserts, etc., plus we also lived off trans fats (Country Crock margarine) for at least a decade or more, until someone said, "Oops, we made a mistake, butter is better for you!" Gee whiz!.

What I have discovered, especially in the last few years is that Splenda is even better used in conjuction with erythritol (powdered is what I prefer) available at Netrition - Sensato Brand. This is especially true for some things that need a little extra sweetening power than Splenda Granular can give. Splenda does not sweeten chocolate, oats, coconut flour products, peanut butter baked products, etc. optimally. Most other things work well. However, combining Splenda Granular and powdered erythritol or even Xylitol (deadly for dogs to consume - please remember that!) works really well. Erythritol has a slight cooling effect in the mouth if used in excess. It makes a great confectioner's sugar substitute in frostings as, if you taste it - it reminds one of that product. Xylitol may need to be powdered finely in a coffee grinder or powerful blender to prevent grittiness in desserts, and the same with erythritol that comes in granular form. That is why I prefer powdered erythritol. Xylitol may cause gastric distress for some people (however, there are numerous health benefits, such as promoting friendly bacteria in the intestines and strengthening teeth and bones: Health Benefits of Xylitol). Erythritol does not cause any gastrointestinal discomfort at all for the majority of people. Maltitol is very problematic that way.

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Let's Talk About Thickening Agents

Many first time low-carbers are puzzled as to what to use to thicken sauces, stews, soups, protein shakes, etc. People have been known to ask with forlorn hope whether almond flour might do the trick.

Here are a few ideas:

1) Vegetable gums - Xanthan gum (my preference) and guar gum
These need to be used cautiously, as in excess they can make things real gummy (slimy) tasting. Using a small amount of liquid (from the stew or whatever), blend with a small amount of xanthan gum - usually no more than 1/2 tsp to begin with. Then add to the stew and stir on high heat until thickened; repeat if necessary. Vegetable gums will thicken cold or hot liquids. www.netrition.com

2) My Thickening Agent recipe - this is a combo of xanthan gum, guar gum and cornstarch: 1 tsp = 0.4 g carbs It works as well, if not better than the leading commercial Thickening Agent, ThickenThin Not/Starch by Expert Foods. One typically needs less of my Thickening Agent to get the job done. These Thickening Agents (mine) and the commercial variety last a very long time on the shelf and also for the reason that one uses very little at a time. My Thickening Agent can be used with a little liquid in a blender and blended - this is to ensure no lumps. Although, I did not suggest this method in my cookbooks, it is the one I prefer these days. These thickening agents will thicken hot or cold liquids.

3) When making soups with veggies, take some of it and blend in a blender until pureed and add to the soup, or blend all of it for a Creamed soup.

4) If you can stomach the idea - one or two teaspoons of powdered pysillium husks in a shake should help thicken it - great fiber!

5) Some people use glucomannan (konjac) powder. Konjac powder has about ten times the thickening power of cornstarch. Dissolve the konjac powder in a little cold water before adding it to the sauce. Konjac flour thickens nicely when it's heated to boiling temperature. About 1 teaspoon of konjac powder will gel about one cup of liquid. Find it at the Konjac Foods site.

6) To thicken sauces, sometimes all that is needed is a couple of egg yolks. Bring sauce to boil, add a little of the hot sauce to egg yolks in small bowl. Turn heat to low and add egg yolk mixture. Stir vigorously until sauce thickens.

Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Another Article - Low-Carb Benefiting People with Diabetes

How a Low-Carb Diabetes Diet Helps My Dad

Low-Carb for People with Diabetes is Gaining Momentum

Wow - what a load of Carbage!!

I was so surprised to find this article at U.S. News recently published this March. They totally recommend folks with diabetes follow a lower carb diet and this is straight from the ADA!! Wow, things are beginning to change and it is about time, right?

Here is a quote from the article:

"The more carbs a person eats, the higher his or her blood glucose level goes—and the higher the blood glucose, the more insulin the body needs to process the sugar. Research shows that counting carbohydrates helps keep glucose levels in check. A study published in February in Diabetes Care , for example, found that counting carbs and monitoring blood sugar were associated with lower A1C levels (a measure of average blood glucose level during the previous three months) in kids with type 1 diabetes. While there are no numbers to show how many diabetes patients use carb counting, experts say it's likely that the tool is underutilized because of a lack of education for diabetics about how to properly manage their diets."

Sunday, April 5, 2009

*NO BAKE CHOCOLATE COOKIES*

No Bake Chocolate Cookies - Click on image to see larger version

NO BAKE CHOCOLATE COOKIES
A healthy, candy-like cookie.

1 cup quick-cooking oats (250 mL)
1 cup unsweetened coconut, (250 mL)
finely desiccated
1/4 cup cocoa (50 mL)
10 SPLENDA® packets
2 tbsp whole OR skim milk (25 mL)
powder
2 tbsp unsalted butter (25 mL)
2 tbsp peanut butter, no sugar or (25 mL)
salt added, OR almond butter
1/2 cup Da Vinci® Sugar Free (125 mL)
Chocolate Syrup
1 tsp vanilla extract (5 mL)

In large bowl, combine oats, coconut, cocoa, SPLENDA® and whole or skim milk powder.

In cereal bowl, microwave butter and peanut butter or almond butter 1 minute. Stir in Da Vinci® Sugar Free Chocolate Syrup and vanilla extract.

Add peanut or almond butter mixture to dry ingredients, stirring until well combined.

Line cookie sheets with wax paper. Drop cookie dough by tablespoonfuls onto wax paper. Flatten with back of spoon. Refrigerate.

Nutritional Analysis: 24 cookies, 1 cookie:
57.6 calories; 1.2 g protein; 4.5 g fat; 2.1 g carbs

Saturday, April 4, 2009

Microwave Brownies - Happy Easter!



MICROWAVE BROWNIES Easy, gluten-free, fudgey brownie recipes – I could not decide between the two recipes, so provided both recipes. It’s important to make the frosting as together it makes a better tasting brownie. These are even better the next day, after having been refrigerated, but some people may prefer them at room temperature.

Late Breaking News: Replace almond flour and coconut flour with all almond flour or one of my bake mixes, as it appears the coconut flour I have tends to not absorb moisture as much as other brands, so your results might be much drier than mine. Sorry about that! If you are using this brand of coconut flour: Aloha Nu (finely powdered product - not at all coarse) then you can use the exact ingredients posted in these recipes.

Recipe #1

2 eggs
¾ cup Splenda Granular
¼ cup powdered erythritol
½ cup regular butter, melted
2/3 cup almond flour
½ cup cocoa
2 tbsp coconut flour
Chocolate Frosting:
¾ cup Splenda Granular
¼ cup whole or skim milk powder (Hispanic section of Super Walmart or Publix)
3 tbsp whipping cream (or evaporated milk)
2 tbsp powdered erythritol
2 tbsp unsalted butter, melted
1 tbsp water
1 tsp olive oil
½ tsp vanilla extract
1 oz unsweetened baking chocolate

In food processor, combine eggs, Splenda Granular, erythritol, melted butter, almond flour, cocoa and coconut floor; process until well combined. Spray 8 x 8-inch glass dish with nonstick cooking spray. Spread chocolate batter evenly in dish. Microwave on high 5 to 7 minutes, or until set. Spread frosting over brownies. Refrigerate.

Chocolate Frosting: In blender, combine Splenda Granular, milk powder, whipping cream, erythritol, butter, water, olive oil and vanilla extract; blend. In cereal bowl, place baking chocolate. Pour boiling water over chocolate and pour off when molten. Add to blender; blend until combined.

Nutritional Analysis: 25 brownies, 1 brownie per serving
91.4 calorie; 2.0 g protein; 8.2 g fat; 2.8 g carbs

Recipe #2 (Sweeter and possibly more moist)

3 eggs
8 to 12 Splenda packets (to taste), or 3/4 cup Splenda Granular
1/2 cup powdered erythritol, or 1/3 cup powdered erythritol
1/4 cup regular butter, melted
1/4 cup mild-tasting olive oil or coconut oil
2/3 cup almond flour
½ cup cocoa
2 tbsp coconut flour
1/8 to 1/4 tsp salt, to taste
Chocolate Frosting:
¾ cup Splenda Granular
¼ cup whole or skim milk powder (Hispanic section of Super Walmart or Publix)
3 tbsp whipping cream (or evaporated milk)
2 tbsp powdered erythritol
2 tbsp unsalted butter, melted
1 tbsp water
1 tsp olive oil
½ tsp vanilla extract
1 oz unsweetened baking chocolate

In food processor, or blender, combine eggs, Splenda Granular, erythritol, melted butter, olive oil, almond flour, cocoa, coconut flour and salt; process until well combined. Spray 8 x 8-inch glass dish with nonstick cooking spray. Spread chocolate batter evenly in dish. Microwave on high 5 to 7 minutes, or until set. Spread frosting over brownies. Refrigerate.

Chocolate Frosting: In blender, combine Splenda Granular, milk powder, whipping cream, erythritol, butter, water, olive oil and vanilla extract; blend. In cereal bowl, place baking chocolate. Pour boiling water over chocolate and pour off when molten. Add to blender; blend until combined.

Nutritional Analysis: 25 brownies, 1 brownie per serving
93.2 calories; 2.3 g protein; 8.4 g fat; 2.5 g carbs

With 3/4 cup Splenda Granular and 1/3 cup erythritol: 2.9 g carbs

Helpful Hint: If the brownies do not cook or set completely in the center, don't worry about it. It will set in the refrigerator - it will just be more fudgey in the center. I put a coffee cup filled with water and a toothpick in it (to prevent water overheating and exploding) next to the brownie dish, and this prevents the microwave oven from overheating, I think.

Recipe # 4 MICROWAVE BROWNIES

Brownie Batter:
2 eggs, fork beaten
1/2 cup powdered erythritol
8 Splenda packets
1/2 cup regular butter (1 stick), melted
3/4 cup Jennifer's Bake Mix (see below)
1/2 cup cocoa
1/8 to 1/4 tsp salt

Chocolate Frosting:
¾ cup Splenda Granular
¼ cup whole or skim milk powder (Hispanic section of Super Walmart or Publix)
3 tbsp whipping cream (or evaporated milk)
2 tbsp powdered erythritol
2 tbsp unsalted butter, melted
1 tbsp water
1 tsp mild-tasting olive oil (optional)
½ tsp vanilla extract
1 oz unsweetened baking chocolate

Jennifer's Bake Mix:
1 1/2 cups almond flour
1 cup oat or whole wheat pastry flour
1/2 cup vital wheat gluten

1/4 cup = 6.1 g carbs

In food processor, or bowl, combine eggs (fork beaten), erythritol, Splenda, melted butter, Jennfer's Bake Mix, cocoa and salt; process or mix manually until well combined. Spray 8 x 8-inch glass dish with nonstick cooking spray. Spread chocolate batter evenly in dish. Microwave on high 5 to 7 minutes, or until set (very center can be soft and not cooked - no problem - sets in refrigerator and is just more fudgey). Spread frosting over brownies. Refrigerate.

Chocolate Frosting: In blender, combine Splenda Granular, milk powder, whipping cream, erythritol, butter, water, olive oil (if using) and vanilla extract; blend. In cereal bowl, place baking chocolate. Pour boiling water over chocolate and pour off when molten. Add to blender; blend until combined.

Nutritional Analysis: 25 brownies (1 5/8 inch x 1 5/8 inch), 1 brownie per serving: 90.8 calorie; 2.0 g protein; 7.3 g fat; 3.0 g carbs

Nutritional analysis for this recipe using my Splendid Low-Carb Bake Mix (I have not tested the recipe with this bake mix):

1 2/3 cups almond flour
2/3 cup vanilla whey protein (or plain flavored)
2/3 cup vital wheat gluten

1/3 cup = 3.3 g carbs

Nutritional Analysis: 25 brownies, 1 brownie per serving:

81.0 calories; 2.0 g protein; 7.3 g fat; 2.3 g carbs



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