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Friday, November 27, 2009

Include Yogurt on your Low-Carb Diet


Happily, the Go-Diet authors, Jack Goldberg and karen O'Mara changed my outlook with regard to yogurt, buttermilk and kefir). The live cultures such as lactobacillus are hugely beneficial to your health in many ways, not the least of which is helping combat yeast overgrowth (this makes weight loss difficult or near impossible), promoting colon health and boosting the immune system. According to laboratory studies, 1 cup plain yogurt contains four (4) grams of carbohydrate, since these live bacteria have changed the lactose into lactic acid, and this is not taken into account in the nutritional analysis.

Michael Zemel, chairman of the Nutrition Department at the University of Tennesse in Knoxville, found that dairy products (milk included) turn down the tendency of our fat cells to store the day's calories, and increases the amount lost as heat. Hard cheese, such as cheddar, and yogurt will do the same thing. This man spent more than 10 years investigating the possibility that dairy products increase the metabolism. It would appear that higher calcium intake is responsible for the phenomenon of increased weight loss while using dairy products, or at the very least the subjects were able to maintain their weight. In the mid-1990's America's Purdue University did a study tracking women between the ages of 18 and 31. That study was to look at the effect of exercise on bone health, but during that study it became clear that those women who ate a diet rich in milk, cheese or yogurt lost weight or stayed stable, while others shunning dairy products put on kilos.

Obviously, low-carbers cannot have too much milk, since a cup of milk has a fair number of carbs (around 12 grams), however, I use whole milk in my tea, and I eat plain whole milk yogurt every day, until I run out and need to get more. I sweeten my yogurt with Splenda Granular and sometimes add frozen strawberries (slightly thawed) and top with sliced almonds - or I'll add a teaspoon or two of flax seed meal to my plain yogurt.

I have some fantastic, easy frozen yogurt recipes in my cookbooks. I've always made milk shakes for our sons with frozen fruit, yogurt, milk and sweetener. They loved those! They have so little body fat, but maybe it also has to do with the fact that they didn't have too much sugar growing up, that they're young and that they love physical exercise (such as tennis, swimming and hiking).

The moral of the story - eat your yogurt at the very least. Don't be afraid of it. It can only help. There are some people who do yogurt fasts for 2 to 3 days and report super weight losses. At the very least, it would give one's system a rest and combat Candida, which impairs weight loss.

9 comments:

Former Donut Junkie said...

Jennifer, I'm so glad you posted this piece about yogurt and all it's many benefits. I love yogurt but have for the most part steered clear of it for fear of the carbs. There are so many different opinions on using yogurt as part of the low-carb nutritional lifestyle. Therein lies the problem, they are merely opinions and no more! Thanks for the info on the actual study. University of Tennessee....right here in my hometown.

I plan on posting a link on my blog to your wonderful article. This clears up a lot of questions and misinformation. I'll be picking up some more of that great whole milk yogurt and maybe even some of my favorite....Greek yogurt! Thanks a million! Ron, aka The Former Donut Junkie.

Jennifer said...

Hey, you're back, Ron! Good to "see" you and you say you're blogging again? I'll make sure to take a look.

So happy you can have your yogurt again without guilt. Hmm, Greek yogurt sounds super.

Steve Parker, M.D. said...

Jennifer, the nutrient database at NutritionData.com indicates plain yogurt from whole milk has 11 g of digestible carb in one cup. Are you saying that is wrong in view of the lactate issue?

So many commercial yogurts these days add sugar or HFCS that I wouldn't be surprised if the carb count is even higher.

Now, I've heard that some Greek yogurts are significantly lower in carbs.

-Steve

Jennifer said...

According to the Go-Diet Doctors, that 11 grams also contains the carbohydrate (lastose) which is turned completely into lactic acid by the live bacteria. They naturally subtracted the lactose carbohydrate grams in the yogurt.

It would have to be plain yogurt with no fillers/starches or sugars added and using live bacterial culture.

Jennifer said...

P.S. I didn't know that about Greek yogurts. I don't think I've ever had Greek yogurt, but hear good things about it.

Former Donut Junkie said...

The Greek yogurts I've seen have 9g carbs instead of the standard 11g in most plain yogurts. It is indeed less but the taste and texture is out of this world so far as I'm concerned.

Jennifer said...

Wow, fewer carbs and superior taste - how can one go wrong? Could that mean Greek yogurt is then 2 grams of carbohydrate per cup? Truly amazing!

quality control in china said...

wooo... its looking so yummy hehehe thanks for sharing this with us...

Jennifer said...

You're welcome. :-)